Does Bipolar Disorder Qualify For SSD Benefits?

Bipolar disorder (formerly known as manic depression) causes people to cycle between high states (mania) and depressive states. The condition, with its unpredictable ups and downs, can prevent a person from maintaining stable employment. As such, individuals with bipolar disorder may be eligible for Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits. Unfortunately, many find their claims for these benefits denied.

For decades, the attorneys at Cutter Hall Karlock, L.L.C., have helped individuals in Ohio apply for benefits. We understand the process, we know what the Social Security Administration is looking for in applications, and we work hard to ensure our clients provide the appropriate medical evidence to demonstrate bipolar disorder's effect on their lives.

Severe Highs And Lows Make Daily Life Difficult

Bipolar disorder is disorienting. Those afflicted find their moods ranging from euphoria to anger and back again. Some fall prey to delusions. In addition, impaired judgment during manic states can lead to dangerous, spontaneous behavior. There are an array of corollary effects as well, including fatigue, weight change, loss of interest in activities, difficulty concentrating or making decisions, insomnia or sleeping too much. Clearly, many individuals with bipolar disorder have difficulty maintaining a job.

To demonstrate the disorder's effect on your ability to work, you must submit a documented history of a minimum of two years of bipolar disorder with symptoms treated by medications or psychotherapy. Evidence of repeated episodes of worsening de-compensation or inability to function with increased mental demands, or a current history of one or more years of inability to function outside a highly supportive living environment, may also be required.

Discuss Your Chances Of Filing A Successful Claim

If you would like to discuss your case with an experienced attorney who can assess whether you may qualify for SSD benefits, reach out to our firm. You can call us at 614-254-5503 or contact us online.

We offer free initial consultations, enabling us to inform you of your options before you are obliged to pay.