If you have a child with a disability, you know how important it is to find ways for your child to have an income stream sufficient to provide for their care and basic living expenses. For children who are over the age of 18, your Social Security earnings may well provide an opportunity to receive financial benefits.

The Social Security Administration explains that your adult disabled child may be able to receive benefits from your record if specific eligibility requirements are met, starting with the SSA’s definition of being disabled. You must also be receiving either disability or retirement benefits yourself. An adult disabled child may also be able to receive benefits from a deceased parent’s record.

The child’s disability must have been identified before they turned 22 and, in most cases the child cannot be married. There are some exceptions for disabled adults married to other disabled adults, however. Your adult disabled child may work but the SSA outlines an earning cap in order to receive SSD benefits. Your child may be able to receive Supplemental Security Income or Medicaid benefits as well, but this should be reviewed carefully as not all types of benefits may be received together. These benefits may be available to your biological, adopted or even stepchild.

This information is not intended to provide legal advice but is instead meant to give parents of adult disabled children an overview of how their child may be able to qualify and receive Social Security Disability benefits and how the receipt of those benefits may interact with their receipt of other types of benefits.